How Terri Reed Experiences What Her Characters Do

Terri Reed’s novels have appeared on Publisher’s Weekly top twenty-five, Nielsen’s Bookscan top hundred, Amazon Bestseller and featured in USA Today. Her books have been finalists in Romance Writers of America RITA contest, National Readers’ Choice Award and three-time finalists in the American Christian Fiction Writers The Carol Award contest.

How do you connect with your characters?
Terri: I do a great deal of personality building when I’m forming my characters. I settle on their backgrounds based on the needs of the story and then put the characters through personality tests. But the characters usually surprise me as I’m writing. They will react in ways I hadn’t expected which makes the development of the characters a fun challenge.

How do you ensure your books are accurate?
Terri: I do a lot of reading online and reference books on law enforcement procedure. I have attended a sixteen-week citizens academy for my local sheriff’s department, which was fascinating and something everyone should do. I also went to a conference for writers called Writer’s Police Academy, where every workshop had something to do with law enforcement and emergency responders. There were self-defense classes; the bomb squad had a demonstration, as did the K-9 unit. I rode in a fire truck and cleared a smoke filled house. I’ve shot all sorts of different weapons from handguns to automatic rifle with a scope, and handled and worn tactical gear. The best part of all the in-person research is observing the officers and emergency personnel and incorporating their mannerisms into my characters.

What is absolutely essential for you to write? (i.e., a quiet space, classical music, cup of coffee)
Terri: My writing process has changed over the last few years. I used to only be able to write at my desk in my office with music playing, a cup of tea and some snacks close by. If I was to work anywhere else I did so by hand with pen and paper, then type the work in at my desk. However, in 2017 I broke my right wrist. Yes-I’m right handed. The break was bad and didn’t heal properly so over the next year and half I had two surgeries and hours of physical therapy. Though the hand is better there are still issues with swelling and pain. I was forced to figure out a new way to write and with much gnashing of teeth I have learned to dictate my first draft. I’ve embraced this new process, as it’s much faster for that rough draft. Then I can work at my desk to clean it up for short burst of time, until the hand/wrist start to complain.

Current book: Buried Mountain Secrets
A desperate woman and a handsome deputy must work together to find her missing teenage brother and stop deadly treasure hunters.

Connect with Terri
Website: http://www.terrireed.com
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/terrireedauthorpage/

The Plot Inspiration of Mike Garrett

Mike Garrett is a devout Christian, internationally respected book editor, and published author. His secular novel, Keeper, was optioned for a movie. Innocence Denied is his first Christian novel. He lives in Alabama with his wife Sharon, a dachshund (Heidi), and a stray cat now seventeen years old (Mia).

Where do you get the inspiration for your plots?
Mike: This question has always fascinated me. Where do ideas come from? I can’t “force” an idea. Ideas zap into my head any time, anywhere, without any instigation on my part. I can only credit God with my ideas. There’s just no other explanation for me. If I didn’t make it happen, who did?

How do you pick the location/setting of your romantic suspense novels?
Mike: The location is always dictated by the story itself. In Innocence Denied, I needed an isolated place for Derrick and Larissa to hide in, so I set it in the off-season at Logan Martin Lake, where they would be less likely to be seen. I’m intimately familiar with the area since I owned a lake house there for many years. Write what you know!

What is one of your favorite ways to connect with readers?
Mike: I always enjoy hearing from readers via email. It’s non-intrusive, and I can respond when I have free time.

Which of your books is your favorite and why?
Mike: Innocence Denied is by far my favorite because it’s close to my heart. I wrote it with no profit motive in mind, no attempt to advance my career or put myself in the spotlight. Its message was my entire focus, and I feel honored to create something to honor God with the very spiritual gifts that He blessed me with.

Current Book: Innocence Denied
Derrick Walton puts his life at risk to rescue a falsely accused murderer from life in prison, then saves her soul.

Connect w/Mike
Website: www.innocencedeniedbook.com
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/InnocenceDenied/?modal=admin_todo_tour
Twitter: @MGarrett49
Google Plus: https://plus.google.com/105177754354469742892
Linked-In: http://www.linkedin.com/in/michael-garrett-6ba065154

 

 

How a True Story Inspired Gail Sattler’s Latest Book

Gail Sattler lives in Vancouver, British Columbia, where you don’t have to shovel rain. When she’s not writing, she plays bass for an Elton John tribute band and a jazz band, and piano for a smaller band. Other times, Gail likes to read with a cup of coffee.

Why did you start writing romantic suspense novels?
Gail: The Other Neighbor is my first romantic suspense. I wrote it because it’s based on a true story. Years ago, going back to Y2K (Dec 31, 1999), a customer of my husband was plotting to do exactly what the antagonist in this book was planning. (Sorry, I’m not giving that away!) As I wrote the book, my husband joked that he hopes we make enough money from this book to offset what he lost when his ex-customer was arrested, the business closed and the man declared bankruptcy because he owed a lot of people, including us, a lot of money.

When do you find time to write?
Gail: I work full time, plus I’m in three bands, so I don’t have a lot of free time. My husband sold his business and retired early, so he does all the housework, which gives me time to write.

What is your favorite spot for reading or reflecting on your current work-in-progress?
Gail: The same place I write. I need to read it in order to reflect on it. Since we are recent empty-nesters, I converted one of the now-empty bedrooms into an office. Where I can close the door.

What is one of your favorite ways to connect with readers?
Gail: Facebook. I love to see posts, and often forward the ones I like best. Likewise, I love it when people forward posts that I’ve made.

What is absolutely essential for you to write?
Gail: A quiet space, thus the closed door on my new office, and Starbucks coffee, which is provided by my future daughter-in-law’s generosity. Gotta love her.

Current Book: The Other Neighbor
Cheryl Richardson’s neighbor is building a bomb! When FBI agent Steve Gableman moves next door to learn the target, will Cheryl be the one to explode?

Connect w/Gail
Website: www.gailsattler.com
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/gail.sattler.3

 

Writing: Still Alive and Well in the Next Generation

This post originally ran on the ACFW blog in October 2018.

 

Have you heard the news about the death of words? Every few weeks or so, a story pops up in my Facebook feed about how people aren’t reading like they used to, how texting is obliterating writing, and how the Generation Z will kill off books. But I don’t believe them, and you shouldn’t either.

Consider my own household as a micro-test case. I have four kids—two teenage daughters and two tween sons. Besides having a house stuffed with books, we value writing in our family, given my background in magazine editing/writing and my husband’s career in publications in the association world. That means we discuss things like misplaced apostrophes (people, years and decades can NOT be possessive!) and why grammar matters around the dinner table with my teenagers and their two tween brothers.

We’ve always encouraged writing in all forms, and it’s been a delight to see our kids enjoy writing. For example, my oldest daughter was invited to join the first Advanced Composition class in her high school as a sophomore because her freshman English teacher was impressed by her writing.

My children have held summer writing clubs with their friends where I’ve been the “guest” speaker. Imagine how fun it is to talk about writing fiction with four or five tween and young teen girls! Some summers, my girls even roped in their younger brothers into a Hamaker family writing club. I’d find them all scribbling away on our covered back porch on a summer afternoon, each busily writing their stories in battered notebooks.

In late September, one of my daughters asked when we were going to meet about NaNoWriMo. My daughters have participated alongside me for the past three or four years in November’s National Novel Writing Month. We will meet a few times ahead of November to discuss plots, how to plan, what to do when you get stuck in the middle, and how to find time to write in the midst of their busy ninth and tenth grade school work. The girls will likely work on fan fiction involving their latest K-pop band (Korean pop boy bands is their current obsession), which they share online through various social media groups.

Why am I telling you all about my kids and their scribblings? To encourage you in your own writing and to ask you to be on the lookout for how you can encourage the younger generation’s interest in the written word. Even if your kids are grown and flown, you can still have a hand in helping the next generation connect with reading and writing. Volunteer to read in elementary schools (many have designated Guest Reader days), contact middle and high schools about volunteering in their library or writing groups/clubs.

The Editing Process of Sharon K. Connell

Sharon K. Connell has visited 44 states and has also traveled to Canada and Mexico. Her novels reflect experiences she’s had during that time. Her genre, Christian romantic suspense, sometimes has a little mystery, but always humor. She also writes short stories in other genres.

Why did you start writing romantic suspense novels?
Sharon: Romantic suspense is one of the genres I’ve always enjoyed reading. It was a natural place to start when I realized I should be writing myself. I believe the Lord laid the desire on my heart.

What’s the hardest part of writing romantic suspense?
Sharon: The most difficult part would be blending the romantic scenes in with the suspense so it all flows together.

When do you find time to write?
Sharon: Finding time isn’t a problem being retired from the 9 to 5 world. Writing is now my full-time job. The problem I face is fitting my everyday chores into my writing time. LOL

What is your favorite spot for reading or reflecting on your current work-in-progress?
Sharon: Easy answer. When it comes to writing, my home office. For reading, my favorite spot is curled up on the couch.

How do you come up with titles for your books?
Sharon: My titles all come from Scripture. A verse that represents the story.

What’s your go-to when you need a pick-me-up to keep writing?
Sharon: Coffee…of course. LOL Perhaps some dark chocolate. LOL

Where do you get the inspiration for your plots?
Sharon: The ideas simply come to me as a story line, sometimes at the oddest moments. I may see something on TV that triggers an idea, or I might be reading another story, and something in that story starts me thinking about…what if?

How do you pick the location/setting of your romantic suspense novels?
Sharon: The locations settings, so far, have been places where I’ve lived or visited. I know them well. If I pick a location I’m not personally familiar with, I do a lot of travelling via the Internet and books to learn about the place.

What is one of your favorite ways to connect with readers?
Sharon: Most of my readers have contacted me either on Facebook or Twitter and have become close acquaintances through social media. I love staying connected with them and learn so much from them.

How do you ensure your books are accurate?
Sharon: When I’m finished with a first draft, I read it over myself to make sure everything sounds right and the words are correct. After that, I go over each chapter using my own editing program. That chapter is then sent to my critique group for their input. When I receive the critiques (can be from three to a dozen), I go over the chapter again for necessary changes. Once I’m satisfied with that chapter, I move on to the next. By the time I’m finished with the last chapter, it’s time to send it to my editor. Necessary changes from editing are then gone over, followed by reading through the story once more to check the flow of the story.

What has been most rewarding about writing romantic suspense?
Sharon: Hearing from my readers how they enjoyed and reacted to the story.

Which of your books is your favorite and why?
Sharon: My favorite book to date is Paths of Righteousness. It was the first story I wrote, although it was published second, and has now been rewritten in a better style. This story revolves around a young woman working in a doctor’s office. When I started writing it, I too was working in a doctor’s office, so I related with her problems and the relationship she had with her coworkers and doctors. Of course, the rest is made up.

Current book title: Paths of Righteousness
When a new doctor is hired, misunderstandings add to Kathryn’s already complicated emotions. Will she make the right choices in the end…or more mistakes?

Connect w/Sharon
Website: http://sharonkconnell.com/
Amazon Author Page: http://www.amazon.com/author/sharonkconnell
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/averypresenthelpbook1
https://www.facebook.com/ChristianRomanceSuspense/
https://www.facebook.com/groups/ChristianWritersAndReadersGroupForum/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/SharonKConnell
Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/SharonKConnell
LinkedIn:  https://www.linkedin.com/in/sharonkconnell
Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/rosecastle1/

 

January 2019 New Releases in Christian Fiction

More in-depth descriptions of these books can be found on the ACFW Fiction Finder website.


Amish Romance:

Seasons of an Amish Garden by Amy Clipston — Enjoy a year of beautiful seasons in this new story collection, as young Amish couples manage a community garden and harvest friendships and love along the way. (Amish Romance from HarperCollins Christian Publishing)

Courting Her Prodigal Heart by Mary Davis — Pregnant and alone, Dori Bontrager is sure her Amish kin won’t welcome her—or the child she’s carrying—into the community. And she’s determined that her return won’t be permanent. As soon as she finds work, she’ll leave again. But with her childhood friend Eli Hochstetler insisting she and her baby belong here, will Dori’s path lead back to the Englisher world…or into Eli’s arms? (Amish Romance from Love Inspired [Harlequin])


Contemporary Romance:

Her Hope Discovered by Cynthia Herron — Charla Winthrop, a savvy business woman seeking a permanent lifestyle change in small-town Ruby, Missouri, learns that things aren’t always what they appear when she takes up residence in a house steeped in charm and a hint of mystery. Rumor has it that Sam Packard the town carpenter is her go-to guy for home remodeling, but can Charla convince him to help her—with no strings attached, of course? Alone far too long, Sam’s prayed that God would send him a wife and a mother for his daughters. However, the new Ruby resident is hardly what he imagined. A new place to call “home,” the possibility of what might be, and the answer to someone’s prayers unite this unlikely pair with the help of the town’s residents. (Contemporary Romance from Mountain Brook Ink)


Cozy Mystery:

Murderous Heart by Lynne Waite Chapman — Freelance writer, Lauren Halloren pens popular magazine articles extoling the comfort and security of small town America. And Evelynton, Indiana treasures its wholesome small town values. Ask anyone. Streets are safe to walk. People look out for one another. Marriage vows are treasured. Murders are solved. In this third volume of the Evelynton Murder series, Lauren, along with friends, Clair and Anita stumble over another body. The partially mummified remains turn out to be an Evelynton resident. But how, in this close knit community, could a woman be deceased for over six months without being missed? (Cozy Mystery from Winged Publications)


Historical Romance:

My Heart Belongs in the Blue Ridge: Laurel’s Dream by Pepper Basham — Journey into the Blue Ridge Mountains of 1918 where Laurel McAdams endures the challenges of a hard life while dreaming things can eventually improve. But trouble arrives in the form of an outsider. Having failed his British father again, Jonathan Taylor joins is uncle’s missionary endeavors as a teacher in a two-room schoolhouse. Laurel feels compelled to protect the tenderhearted teacher from the harsh realities of Appalachian life, even while his stories of life outside the mountains pull at Laurel’s imagination. Faced with angry parents over teaching methods, Laurel’s father’s drunken rages, and bad news from England, will Jonathan leave and never return, or will he stay and let love bloom? (Historical Romance from Barbour Publishing)

The Homeward Journey by Misty M. Beller — Finally free from her dead husband’s addicted lifestyle, Rachel Gray and her young son set out for a new life in the wilderness of the Canadian territories. She is reluctant to accept help from another man, but after a bear threatens her son’s life, she agrees to accompany two God-fearing brothers who are traveling to the same area. Slowly, she begins to trust the one named Seth. Despite Rachel’s best efforts, she can’t seem to fight her attraction to Seth—until a secret from his past proves he had more in common with her husband than she thought. When a new peril threatens her son’s life, she must choose between trusting in what she can control, or the man who her heart says is trustworthy, no matter his previous sins. The path she chooses just may determine whether she can step into the new life God has in store for them all. (Historical Romance, Independently Published)

Stepping into the Light by Candee Fick — With war looming and a madwoman in their midst, the only hope for a peaceful future may lie in a marriage alliance between a disfigured recluse of the Gunn clan and the overlooked second son of Clan Sinclair. (Historical Romance, Independently Published)

Under the Midnight Sun by Tracie Peterson and Kimberley Woodhouse — Tayler Hale is ahead of her time as one of the first women naturalists. She has always loved adventure and the great outdoors, and her remote job location also helps keep her away from the clutches of the man to whom she once made a foolish promise. It seems she must keep running, however, and in secret, her boss from Yellowstone arranges for a new job . . . in Alaska. The popular Curry Hotel continues to thrive in 1929 as more visitors come to Alaska and venture into the massive national park surrounding Denali. Recent graduate Thomas Smith has returned to the hotel and the people he considers family. But when a woman naturalist comes to fill the open position and he must work with her, everything becomes complicated. The summer brings unexpected guests and trouble to Curry. With his reputation at stake, will Thomas be able to protect Tayler from the danger that follows? (Historical Romance from Bethany House [Baker])

Devotion by Olivia Rae — Injured and unable to make his living by the sword, Sir Theo de Born needs to secure his keep by becoming an educated man. As he finds himself falling for his reluctant teacher, he learns of her plan to leave England before the winter sets in. How can he convince her to stay and fulfill her promise while protecting his heart? Denied her true love and sent away to a convent, Lady Rose de Payne has no choice but to accept to become Sir Theo’s teacher. However, she has a plan to escape the confines of her new prison and start fresh in a different country. As the chilly winds blow, her resolve begins to waver. Will she abandon Sir Theo to a miserable fate or will she give up her dreams to make his come true? (Historical Romance from HopeKnight Press)

Why You Might Want to Stay Away From Pies Baked by Mary Ball

Mary L. Ball is a multi-published Christian author. She lives in North Carolina and enjoys fishing and ministering in song with her hubby at various functions. Her books are about small-town romance, suspense and mystery influenced by the grace of Jesus Christ.

What’s the weirdest way someone has died or been killed in your novels?
Mary: In my debut novel, Escape to Big Fork Lake, a pie baked with berries from the Yew bush poisoned a character.

How do you research ways to kill someone for your books?
Mary: I’ll get a vague idea and spend hours on Google or Bing researching stories and articles that pertain to the situation.

Have you ever regretted killing off a character? Why?
Mary: Yes. In Sparks of Love, the main character’s father was killed by arson. It was hard because of the emotions associated with losing a loved one.

Current book: Rose Colored Christmas
Young widow Emilee Arnold enjoys everything about Christmas. She rescues a pilot from a burning plane and is snowed in with her very own Scrooge.

Connect w/Mary
Website: http://www.marylball.com/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/gracefulbooks
Twitter: https://twitter.com/inspires4mary
Google Plus: https://plus.google.com/u/0/+MaryLBall9
Amazon Author Page: https://www.amazon.com/Mary-L-Ball/e/B007O97Y0E
Singing Ministry website: http://heirsofsalvation2.webs.com

 

December 2018 New Releases in Christian Fiction


More in-depth descriptions of these books can be found on the ACFW Fiction Finder website.


Amish Romance:

The Amish Sweet Shop by Laura Bradford, Mary Ellis, and Emma Miller — It’s almost Valentine’s Day at Beechy’s Sweets, where the Amish gifts of love and faith are even sweeter than the home-made candy. In The Sweetest Courtship by Emma Miller, bachelor Jacob Beechy is a master candy maker whose mother longs for grandchildren, so she sets out to find him an assistant confectioner during the Valentine’s holiday—and a wife. In The Sweetest Truth by Laura Bradford, Sadie Fischer can’t see beyond her scars from a barn fire, but there’s a young man who sees only sweetness when he looks at her, and he’s sending her Beechy’s chocolate and mysterious gifts leading up to Valentine’s Day. In Nothing Tastes So Sweet by Mary Ellis, Pregnant widow Hannah wants to buy her English employer’s hardware store, but ends up following a clue from Beechy’s to clear a man’s name—and finds a partnership in work, faith, and love. (Amish Romance from Kensington)

Amish Christmas Memories by Vannetta Chapman — When a young Amish woman collapses in the snow shortly before Christmas, Caleb Wittmer rushes to her aid. Only, “Rachel” remembers nothing of who she is. Now his family has taken in the pretty stranger, disrupting Caleb’s ordered world. He’s determined to find out where she belongs…even if Rachel’s departure means saying goodbye to his old-fashioned heart forever. (Amish Romance from Love Inspired [Harlequin])

A Quilt for Jenna (Apple Creek Dreams #1) by Patrick E. Craig — On her way to win a quilting competition—and a ticket out of Amish life, Jerusha finds her God, her missing husband, and a lost little girl in the heart of the Storm of The Century. (Amish Romance from P & J Publishing)

The Road Home (Apple Creek Dreams #2) by Patrick E. Craig — Adopted into an Amish family as a child, local historian Jenny Springer is looking for the parents she never knew. When Jenny meets Jonathan Hershberger, a drifter from San Francisco who lands in Apple Creek fleeing a drug deal gone wrong, she is intrigued by this Englischer with an Amish name, and offers to help him discover his Amish roots. While Jonathan discovers his need for home, family, and a relationship with God, Jenny finds more than she hoped for—truth and love and the knowledge that you can go home again. (Amish Romance from P & J Publishing)

Jenny’s Choice (Apple Creek Dreams #3) by Patrick E. Craig — When Jenny’s husband disappears in a terrible boating accident, she returns home to Apple Creek, Ohio and her adoptive parents. Working through her grief, she pursues newfound writing dreams and is presented with a possible romance with a handsome young publisher, until the elders of her church confront her consideration of going outside her faith to pursue her dreams. At the same a faint hope that her husband might someday be found alive holds her heart in the past. (Amish Romance from P & J Publishing)

Minding the Amish Baby by Carrie Lighte — Amish store clerk Tessa Fisher isn’t ready for marriage or a family—until a baby girl is abandoned on her doorstep. Now Tessa and her gruffly handsome landlord, Turner King, must mind the baby together. And soon Turner and the sweet-cheeked kind are burrowing into Tessa’s heart. But with secrets between them, can the temporary family find a way to stay together forever? (Amish Romance from P & J Publishing)


Contemporary Romance:

Who I Am with You by Robin Lee Hatcher — Jessica was pregnant and facing divorce when her husband and daughter were killed in a car accident. Withdrawing from friends and family, she feels far away from God. Then months later she receives her great-grandfather’s Bible at her grandmother’s funeral. Ridley has suffered his own loss. Bitter over disgrace at his job, an ended career, and subsequent breakup with is girlfriend, he retreats to a vacation property owned by his parents to lick his wounds and hide from the press. Thumbing through the Bible later, Jessica journeys through the aged margin notes, back to faith and wholeness. And the broken roads they have followed bring Jessica and Ridley to each other as well. (Contemporary Romance from HarperCollins Christian Publishing)


Historical:

Three Christmas Novellas by Mary Connealy — Three Christmas Novellas in one volume: Long Horn Christmas, The Sweetest Gift and The Christmas Candle. (Historical, Independently Published)

The Making of Mrs. Hale by Carolyn Miller — Can a runaway marriage ever be redeemed? Julia Hale ran off to be married in Gretna Green, following romance instead of common sense. But her tale isn’t turning into a happily ever after. Her new husband is gone and she doesn’t know where—or if he’s ever coming back. Julia has no option but to head home to the family she betrayed by eloping and to hope they’ll forgive her.Along the way she will learn how relationship with God can bring restoration and hope, and find the answers she needs both for her husband and her future. (Historical, Kregel Publications)

Child of Light by Annette O’Hare — While praying for her own Christmas miracle after five years in a childless marriage, Margaret offers aide to a destitute and expectant young woman during the holidays. She is condemned for her decision to help a woman of ill repute and must face the consequences of doing what is right. Will Margaret’s prayers for a child of her own be answered this Christmas or does God have something else in store? (Historical from Harbourlight Books [Pelican])

The Plum Blooms in Winter by Linda Thompson — Inspired by a Gripping True Story from World War II’s Daring Doolittle Raid–Japan, 1948: A prostitute seeks her revenge; a war hero finds his true mission. (Historical from Mountain Brook Ink)


Historical Romance:

The MissAdventure Brides Collection by Mary Davis, Cynthia Hickey, Kathleen E. Kovach, Debby Lee, Donna Schlachter, Marjorie Vawter, and Kimberley Woodhouse — Seven daring damsels refuse to let the cultural norms of their eras hold them back! Follow along as they trek the wilderness as a fur trapper; teach in the backwoods; campaign for women’s rights; breed llamas; drive cross-country; become a hotel tour guide; and pursue art. Will they meet men who admire their bravery and determination? (Historical Romance from Barbour Publishing)

Kiss Me Once Again by Gail Kittleson — When Glenora Carson’s first love perishes along with the crew of the U.S.S. Arizona on December 7, 1941, she locks away her heart and her dreams of attending college on scholarship, instead choosing to hold down the home front by helping out the family business – Carson’s Garage. The grease-stained overalls don’t do much to compliment her female figure, but they cover her female heart well enough. That is, until Hank Anderson, a wounded warrior back from battle, walks into the garage and into Glenora’s life. Is an old maid’s future Glenora’s fate, or will Cupid throw a wrench in her plans? (Historical Romance from WordCrafts Press)

Stagecoach to Liberty by Janalyn Voigt — Can a desperate young woman trust the handsome Irish stranger who wants to free her from her captors? (Historical Romance from Mountain Brook Ink)

How Carole Brown Picks Her Book Settings

A member of many writing groups, Carole Brown enjoys mentoring beginning writers. An author of 10 books, she loves to weave suspense and tough topics into her books. She and her husband reside in Ohio but have ministered and counseled nationally and internationally.

What’s the hardest part of writing romantic suspense?
Carole: Keeping instances in order. I like to take lots of notes: questions I want to make sure are answered when I go through the draft, that timing is correct and that details are happening at the right time, that personal descriptions hold true throughout.

How do you come up with titles for your books?
Carole: I brood constantly about any new book I begin for a title. Most times, with a little musing, I know and feel what the title should be. Sometimes, not often, I will ask friends or fellow authors for suggestions. Most times, I will get enough fodder to put together one that pleases me. They come easy, and they come with work. 🙂

Have you ever regretted killing off a character? Why?
Carole: No, but I’m planning a second, follow-up, book for my debut novel. In it, I feel there has to be a traitor in the new church family, and I’m dreading that. Those who came out of the cult from the first book all hold a special place in my heart. I don’t want to be disappointed or sad over them, but, so far, it looks as if it will come to that. Someday…

How do you pick the location/setting of your romantic suspense novels?
Carole: We’ve traveled through a lot of the United States, so, with research, I can usually get the feel of the setting in my books. In an upcoming new series, the setting is up in the air, so we’ll either vacation there (with research that I enjoy) or do extensive research online and/or with physical materials, as the area will be totally different than I’m used to.

I also like to study pictures of states where my settings take place. There’s an online site where you can sign up to get regular emails from states that you choose. It’s a valuable resource with lots of pictures, articles about different towns, activities, places to eat, and lots more.

Current book: Toby’s Troubles
A ghost, a thief, a girl in love, and unsuccessful bidding at the auctions keep Toby and his antique shop, Undiscovered Treasures, on edge.

Connect W/Carole
Website: http://sunnebnkwrtr.blogspot.com/
Facebook: https://facebook.com/CaroleBrown.author
Twitter: https://twitter.com/browncarole212
Google Plus: https://plus.google.com/u/0/113068871986311965415/posts
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/browncarole212/?hl=en
Amazon Author Page:  http://www.amazon.com/Carole-Brown/e/B00EZV4RFY/ref=sr_ntt_srch_lnk_1?qid=1427898838&sr=8-1
BookBub: https://www.bookbub.com/authors/carole-brown
Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/sunnywrtr/boards/
Goodreads: http://www.goodreads.com/user/show/5237997-carole-brown
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/carole-brown-79b6951a/
Stitches in Time: http://stitchesthrutime.blogspot.com/

 

 

What has been most rewarding about writing romantic suspense?

Where Linda Shenton Matchett Gets Her Best Ideas

Linda Shenton Matchett is an author, speaker and history geek. A native of Baltimore, Md., she was born a stone’s throw from Fort McHenry and has lived in historic places all her life. She is a volunteer docent at the Wright Museum of WWII.

When do you find time to write?
Linda: I’m a very structured person, so I schedule my writing time to ensure it happens. I’m an early riser, so am usually at my desk by 5:30 or 6 a.m. at the latest. Sunday mornings before church are dedicated to my blogging and other social media writing. Weekdays mornings are used to write my books. My favorite day is Wednesday. I don’t have to be at work until 1 p.m., so I have hours to write!

How do you research ways to kill someone for your books?
Linda: Research is one of my favorite aspects of writing, and I’ve been lucky to stumble on several excellent resources. A co-worker is a former NH State police officer, and he has been incredibly helpful. In addition, The Great Courses is a video educational company that offers several forensics courses I’ve purchased. The teacher is Professor Elizabeth Murray of Mount St. Joseph University, and she has graciously answered lots of questions for me. As a member of Sisters in Crime, I’ve been able to tap into a number of subject matter experts. My brother is in the medical field and has been a huge help also.

Where do you get the inspiration for your plots?
Linda: Everywhere! Seriously, I have a folder where I stuff ideas. Inspiration has come from Bible stories, newspaper and magazine articles, books or movies that I think should have been done differently, historic events, brainstorming sessions with my husband, and overheard conversations—you can’t believe what people talk about in public!

What is one of your favorite ways to connect with readers?
Linda: My absolute favorite way to connect with readers is through Facebook parties. I’m an extrovert and love to socialize, so the opportunity to meet people from all over the world and talk about everything from books to childhood memories is wonderful. FB parties have also been a great way to discover new authors, so my TBR continues to grow!

Current book: Murder of Convenience
Geneva Alexander joins the USO to escape the engagement her parents have arranged for her, and winds up as the suspect for her betrothed’s murder.

Connect w/Linda
Website: www.LindaShentonMatchett.com
Facebook: www.facebook.com/LindaShentonMatchettAuthor
Twitter: www.twitter.com/lindasmatchett
Google Plus: https://plus.google.com/u/0/+LindaMatchett
Pinterest: www.pinterest.com/lindasmatchett